How to Choose Your Wedding Colors

How to Choose Your Wedding Colors

It’s often said that choosing a wedding dress is as hard as choosing a husband. Some think it might actually be harder since it’s often the groom that chooses you. Still, choosing the dress starts with picking the right color.

For many brides, this isn’t really an issue, since most wedding gowns are white. You might choose a wedding gown designer like Pronovias, or you might have a dream wedding dress Sydney that you’ve adored since you were five years old. Either way, if you’re wearing white, it’s one less color to worry about.

However, if you’re a modern bride that wants a pop of color in her dress, you have to figure out what that color will be. And it’s not just the color of your dress. You need a palette for your bridesmaids, the décor, and even the wedding cake. Your in-laws might be hemmed in by your color choice, and it might affect the groomsmen too.

Colour isn’t such a big deal for the men in the wedding party. They can probably just wear a cravat, waistcoat, or pocket handkerchief in the selected color. If they’re particularly keen, it might influence their shirts and socks.

For the ladies though, the bridal color will influence their dresses, shoes, flowers, and hair accessories. That’s a lot to coordinate. So how do you choose a color scheme that makes everyone happy, including the mother of the bride?

That’s actually where the trouble begins. The average groom doesn’t’t really care about the colour scheme, but the women in his family will be pretty heavily invested. And you have to find a way to mediate between what you want, what your female relatives want, and what his female relatives want.

It might help, just as a starting point, to have all the ladies list the colors they had in mind. You might get a miracle and find one or two colors you all agree on, and that makes a happy consensus. To improve the chances of common ground, ask everyone to note down four or five preferred colors rather than two.

In the same vein think about the number of colors you want to use. Two is usually adequate to keep things from getting too cluttered. If you wish, you could ask your guests to dress in colors that fit your chosen palette.

Think about the venue when you’re selecting your colors. An indoor wedding gives you a wider option to choose from, especially if it has neutral walls. Outdoor weddings can do well with bright colors. The time of day matters too. Metallic tones that glisten are better for evening weddings and night-time festivities.

As stressed out as you might be by this task, remember that it’s your big day and that your happiness is paramount. So while you may be willing to compromise for your mum or your in-laws, make sure you’re at least comfortable with the color choice.

Not everyone knows what their favorite color is on a conscious level, so if you’re feeling doubtful, look around your house. Start with your wardrobe. Look at your clothes, paying specific attention to the color. Is there a shade that seems more common than others? You might have an unconscious affinity for that color, so maybe you can use it for your wedding.

Once you’ve selected the main color, you can pick a second one that goes with it. Looking at a color wheel may help. Colors that are next to each other on the wheel work well, as do colours that are directly opposite each other. You can also look at magazines for ideas of which colours go well together.

The easiest idea isn’t’t always the best one, and in this case, the easiest idea is to match your favorite color with your fiancéé’s favorite color. If they don’t fit in their original shade, you can always compromise and use variations.

For example, if he likes blue and you like red, maybe you can bend towards pastels and use a satiny pink with a royal blue, or mingle dramatic red with a powdery azure. Or maybe you can put them together and make some nice purples. Another option is to look at bridal magazines and use whichever palette is in vogue that wedding season.

Think about the lighting and photography too. Not all color combinations look good on camera, so ask your photographer for tips as well. And remember, if you end up compromising on everything else; at least have the final say on your wedding dress.

 

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