Why can’t go past the European flair for your furniture and décor

Why You Can’t Go Past The European Flair For Your Furniture And Decor

European style has always had a classic old-world feel to it. And whether we’re fawning over royalty or ooh-ing and ah-ing at the castles of Downton Abbey, we can’t help being fascinated with them. Modern European furniture is an exciting blend of everything that continent has to offer, from minute detail and precision to culturally distinct touches.

And yet even among the Europeans, there’s an undeniable hierarchy of style. The Italians lead the way in runway fashion, while the French rule the roost of home décor. While they often intertwine designers and products, the overarching flavour still reigns.

The French have an interesting life philosophy, as seen in their laid back approach to working hours, their love of complex food and delicate pastries, and their flirty national persona. Their homes seem to follow a set of decorative principles that are equally easy to apply. Here are a few suggestions on how to bring a little France into your home.

Why you can’t go past the European flair for your furniture and déco

Laissez faire

While the British and Germans cling to propriety and precision, the French sway towards an ever shorter work day and their homes show it. If you’ve ever met a teenager that has carefully put himself or herself together in a way that implies no effort at all, they might be a little French. French homes tend to have a deliberate touch of the unfinished. It might be wrinkled bedspread, throw pillows that look carelessly arranged or a gorgeous tea-set with a chipped teapot. Their style says ‘I’m elegant but carefree. I don’t fuss.’

Pièce de résistance

In the same way, the French can seem careless and dismissive while creating impossibly complicated dishes like crepes and soufflés, and they can have an undone living room with an over-the-top centrepiece. French rooms will usually have one grand gesture piece of furniture, whether it’s a plush, brightly coloured European leather lounge, an ornate mirror, luxurious silk curtains that drape to the floor, or an exotic Persian rug. French décor likes to have one stunning focal point to enthral you and throw you off.

Voila l’armoire

The Americans have their walk-in closets, and the French have their armoires. It’s a tasteful free-standing sideboard used to store clothes in the bedroom. Armoires are quite large and can command the whole room. They have drawers, shelving, and sometimes they even have a hanging rod. Armoires offer plenty of storage space. The gap beneath it can keep shoes, while its flat top surface makes a handy counter for jewellery, makeup, and maybe even a dressing mirror. Your armoire can be as simple or complex as you like, with unstained wood, painted panels, or fancy drawer handles.

Allume la lumière

The chandelier is a distinctly French lighting fixture. Installing one brings an instant touch of style and sparkle to your home, especially if you can find a traditional-looking vintage piece. Keep in mind that chandeliers were initially owned by the very wealthy, so having one certainly elevates your home’s status. Be sure that the size of the chandelier matches your room though. You don’t want it grazing the heads of your guests. Such lack of hospitality is distinctly un-European. Remember that chandeliers initially held suspended candles, so give yours an old-school touch with candle-shaped electric bulbs.

L’architecte domestique

While you can hardly install the Eiffel Tower inside your home, it’s clear that architecture is a key part of French culture. Other Europeans are proud of the buildings too, from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to ancient Roman ruins. At the most basic level, you could buy an imported sideboard or entertainment unit and grace it with miniatures of European architecture, from the Arc de Triomphe to London Bridge. Just be sure to display them in a way that is tasteful rather than tacky. Plan B is to install floor tiles that have traditional European styling or to buy statement tables with intricate carving techniques.

La belle baignoire

The French have a specific verb that means ‘to take a shower’ and it’s fairly complex in its conjugation. But as complicated as their bathroom talk is, they take simple pleasure in long bubble soaked baths. Many French homes are graced with beautiful bathtubs. Even the simplest bathroom can be elevated to royal status with the right bathtub. Be sure it’s the right size for your space though. It should be deep enough for a good soak, but you don’t want to buy a gorgeous bath fixture that won’t fit through the door.

Quelle couleur?

In order to do full justice to these dramatic decorative pieces, French homes are generally painted in plain, neutral colours. Preferred palettes include sandy linens, mints, and greys. White is a popular choice as well. This doesn’t mean European homes are dull or washed out. Colour is often introduced through bright dining chairs, sofas, and bed linen.If you want to get suggestion or buy furniture, you can visit to bedroom furniture at Brescia Furniture website , they have lot of professionals to assist you.

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